Caring For Your Dog’s Neck and Spine: Dog Collar Issues

October 10, 2012 by  
Filed under Health and Safety of your Dogs

On one of my visits to my chiropractor, he suggested I pick up the book The Well Adjusted Dog by Dr. Daniel Kamen. The book is written by a chiropractor who also does adjustments on animals, although he doesn’t advertise this. Apparently, chiropractors are not allowed to practice on animals in many states, which I didn’t realize, since I live in Canada and this doesn’t seem to be a problem here in my province. However, what is good to know is that veterinarians in the U.S. are allowed to do adjustments on animals… that is if you can find one that’s studied chiropractic medicine. Not an easy task.

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In any case, Dr. Kamen wrote this book (among others) so that a dog owner could learn to do their own adjustments on their dogs. The book is very informative and walks you through the anatomy of a dog’s spine, teaches you how to feel for mis alignments and provides a variety of techniques that you can do at home. Many of the techniques focus on how to release tense muscles, especially if you’re not comfortable with actually working on spinal column.

While reading the book, I came across a very interesting section which talks about dog collars and how they can easily cause neck problems for a dog. Most of it boils down to our (ie human’s) improper handling of leash control on certain collars. Here’s what Dr. Kamen has to say about dog collars:

“The improper use of collars is the number one cause of cervical (neck) subluxations in dogs. Of all the places to put undue stress, the cervical region, especially the upper two cervical vertebrae, is the most harmful. It is at this point that the body meets the brain.” (Dr. Daniel Kamen, The Well Adjusted Dog, p. 24)

** What Types of Collars Are Available **

I thought I was doing well by using a dog harness. Ha! I quickly learned that this might actually be the cause of my dog’s disc problems located where her neck meets her shoulders. I was even more surprised at what he said was the best collar to use.

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Basically, you will find that there are five major types of collars in use by most dog owners: the regular flat nylon and leather collars, the choke collar, the prong collar, the leader or head collars, and the harness.

** Flat Collars **

The regular flat collars are what most dog owners often choose, however they can also be the most dangerous type. These collars are used for hanging your dog’s tags and for simply attaching the leash to the metal loop. This collar type should never be used for dog training… nor should they be used if you have a hard time controlling your dog while out walking.

When frustrated, owners tend to pull back on the leash to stop the dog from pulling and running, or in many cases, to get them to move along if they’ve stopped to sniff something. This yanking will cause tremendous muscle tightening in the cervical neck area, which in turn results in cervical subluxations. This is one of the largest causes of disc and other neck problems in dogs. Unfortunately, most of these disc problems don’t show up until much later in life. At this point, dog owners either put their dogs on medication for pain control and muscle relaxation or resort to surgery to try to repair the damage of degenerating discs.

** Leader Head Collars **

These appear to be an ideal way to train your dog. A leader collar fits over the head of your dog, much like a muzzle does. The leash attaches to a metal loop located on the collar under the dog’s chin. The idea behind it is to turn the dog’s head to “lead” them where you want to go. Sometimes humans may turn the head too sharply or too hard in frustration when trying to train their dog. This, like the regular collar, can cause upper neck problems.

** Choke Collars **

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