Choosing A Dog Training Course

October 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Dog Needs

Ezy Dog

You’ve got a dog with behavior problems, or you just plain want your dog to listen to you, but you don’t know where to begin. You need help and answers badly, but you don’t want to spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars on a professional dog trainer to come to your house.Well, you’re not alone, there are many people in this situation. While it is true that professional dog trainers usually get the job done the best and in the shortest amount of time, they are very expensive for most people.

But don’t give up on your precious pooch just yet because there is help out there: online help!

There are many dog training courses that you can purchase online that will teach you how to train your dog correctly, and show you what to do about behavior problems like biting, chewing, excessive barking, tearing up your furniture, or peeing in your house.

Many of the good ones also teach you how to train your dog to walk on the leash properly, so that you’re the one in control and your dog is not pulling you everywhere. Some even teach how to train a dog to do tricks.

The problem is that you don’t want to spend your hard earned money without knowing for sure which courses are good, and which ones are just a bunch of hot air and tell you things that will never work.

So, how do you begin on your search for the best dog training course, without getting burned by a substandard course? Follow these rules when looking for a dog training course, and you’ll be one step ahead of the game:

1. Choose a course designed by a professional dog trainer. This is VERY important, because a professional is more likely to reveal practical dog training methods that actually work. If you can, find a dog training course designed by someone who runs a dog training academy or school. They are the true experts in this field.

2. The fact is that dog training courses aren’t really for training dogs at all, they’re for training people, so you want to find one that is easy for you to understand. Look for a course that focuses on training the owner first, because ultimately it is YOU who is going to be training your dog, not the course itself!

3. A good dog training course will focus on teaching you how your dog thinks. People and dogs have been living together for thousands of years, but your dog’s way of thinking is completely different than yours. That’s why most people fail in training their dog on their own and need help in the first place. Look for a dog training course that will teach you how your dog’s mind responds to things, and how to recognize certain dog behavior and what it means. That’s the mark of a winning dog training course.

4. The last thing to consider is price. There are many very good dog training courses out there selling for $100 or less. Don’t think that just because you spend more money that you will get a better course, because it’s simply not true. Some of the more expensive dog training courses are most likely put together by internet marketers, and their only aim is to take your money and give you very little in return. So, keep it under $100, no matter which dog training course you decide to buy.

Dog Training Advise

September 28, 2012 by  
Filed under Dogs

“Why does your dog sit when you tell him to and mine doesn’t ”, “How can your dog heel to you like that?” ”Wow! He comes when you tell him to” – Sound familiar? If it does, you need to invest some time into a little bit of basic dog training. Starting to train your dog from a young age is crucial, as the first few months of his life is when you will have the greatest influence on him; this is where he is shaped into the dog he is going to be when he is all grown up.

The most basic of dog training is to get your dog to sit and come. Teaching your dog those commands are essential for him to learn. These commands are used for various different reasons, if you are in competition, if your dog jumps making him sit will immediately get him off, and “come” is the all important one. If you take your dog for a walk, you let him of the leash and you expect him to come back to you, not run around the park with you chasing after him shouting at him to “get here right this instance”. That would be just down right embarrassing!

To teach your dog how to come requires only the most basic of techniques but a lot of repetition. The simplest way to get him to come is have a toy in one hand and a treat in the other, when you are in the house simply walk away from him, hold out the toy and excitingly call him to you, when he comes over give him a treat, always use the command for come that you are going to use in the future. Doing this several times a day is a great way to teach him, but remember to have lots of long breaks so he doesn’t get bored and stop enjoying it, and don’t forget the treats!

Getting him to sit could be a slight bit harder but again only requires basic dog training. When you have mastered the come command call him to you, place your hand on the end of his back and say “sit” while gently pushing down on his backside, when he sits his bottom down give him a treat and a lot of praise. If you want him to sit longer just delay giving him the treat and the praise, get him to sit but take your time bending down to him and feeding him his tidbits.

Basic dog training is simple and very effective. It should also be fun for you and your dog, it does not have to be hours and hours each day just may be 5 minutes or so. Do not forget to reward your dog and yourself for all the “hard” work though!

 

Dog Training

September 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Dogs Training

Dog training is the process of teaching a dog to exhibit certain desired behaviors in specific circumstances. Some examples are:

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* Teaching a dog basic obedience commands (part of obedience training)
* Teaching a dog to perform tricks casually or for circus acts
* Teaching a guide dog to lead the blind
* Teaching a rescue dog to find victims of a disaster
* Helping a hunting dog learn to perform its instinctive behaviors at appropriate times

The specific behaviors taught in each case are different, but the underlying principles are similar.

In the wild as pack animals, canines have natural instincts that favor training. These instincts are manifested when the dog lives with humans as a desire to please a handler, as a dog would please senior members in a pack in the wild. The handler is simply whoever is working with a dog at the time.

Basic training

Most dogs, no matter their eventual advanced training or intended purpose, live with people and therefore must behave in a way that makes them pleasant to have around and for their own safety and that of other people and pets. Dogs do not figure out basic obedience on their own; it must be trained.

Basic training classes

Professional “dog trainers” usually do not train the dogs, but actually train the owners how to train their own dogs. Although it is also possible to send a dog away to a training school, the owner still must at some point learn what the dog has learned and how to use it and reinforce it. Owners and dogs who attend class together have an opportunity to learn more about each other and how to work together under a trainer’s guidance. Training is most effective if everyone who handles the dog takes part in the training to ensure consistent commands, methods, and enforcement.

Formal training in classes is not always available until the puppy has completed all its vaccinations at around 4 months; however, some trainers offer puppy socialization classes in which puppies can enroll immediately after being placed in their permanent homes as long as disease risk is minimal and puppies have receieved initial vaccinations. In most cases, basic training classes accept only puppies who are at least 3 to 6 months old.

Next article: Dog Training Part II – Age for early training

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Dog Training: Teaching Puppy Not to Jump or Bite

September 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Dogs Training

You finally have your adorable, cuddly new puppy. You are happy to have him and he is happy to have a family. But wait – it’s just the beginning. There are 2 behaviors you need to deal with almost immediately – jumping on people and biting.

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Jumping on people

This is a problem that you or others might inadvertently encourage. He is so little and cute, that little tail is wagging and, after all, isn’t socialization and getting used to people important? Of course socialization and getting used to people is crucial but allowing him to jump on people isn’t the way to do it.Imagine your cute, little puppy as a full grown 80 – 100 pound dog. Will it be so cute when he jumps on people then? No and it will be dangerous if he jumps on children or small adults because he could easily knock them down.

The best time to take care of this is, of course, when he is a puppy. When the puppy jumps up on you or someone else, gently place the puppy’s feet back on the floor. When he remains standing there, be sure to praise him extensively. Give him an alternative to jumping up. Puppies jump up on people to express their enthusiasm, so it is important to redirect this energy in a more socially acceptable direction. Try teaching the puppy to present his paw instead of jumping up. When teaching the puppy to not jump up on people, it is important to be consistent. Consistency is important in any training program, and all members of the family as well as friends must understand that the puppy is not permitted to jump on them – ever.

Biting

Biting is one of those things that every puppy seems to do, and every puppy must be taught not to do. Like many behaviors, such as jumping up on people, biting and nipping can seem cute when the puppy is small, but much less so as he gets older, larger and stronger.

Left to their own devices, most puppies learn to control their biting reflex from their mothers and from their littermates. When the puppy becomes overenthusiastic, whether when nursing or playing, the mother dog, or the other puppies, will quickly issue a correction.

Unfortunately, this type of natural correction often does not occur, since many puppies are removed from their mothers when they are still quite young. It is therefore up to you to take over this important process.

Socializing the puppy with other dogs and puppies is one of the best and most effective ways to teach the puppy the appropriate, and non appropriate way to bite, and to curb the biting response.

Many communities and pet stores sponsor puppy playtime and puppy kindergarten classes, and these classes can be great places for puppies to socialize with each other, and with other humans and animals as well. As the puppies play with each other, they will naturally bite and nip each other. When one puppy becomes too rough or bites too hard, the other puppies will quickly respond by correcting him.

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The best time for this socialization of the puppy to occur is when it is still young. It is vital that every dog be properly socialized, since a poorly socialized dog, or worse, one that is not socialized at all, can become dangerous and even neurotic. Most experts recommend that puppies be socialized before they have reached the age of 12 weeks, or three months.

Another reason for socializing the puppy early is that mothers of young children may be understandably reluctant to allow their young children to play with older or larger dogs. Since socializing the dog with other people is just as important as socializing it with other dogs, it is best to do it when the puppy is still young enough to be non threatening to everyone.

It is important for the puppy to be exposed to a wide variety of different stimuli during the socialization process. The socialization process should include exposing the puppy to a wide variety of other animals, including other puppies, adult dogs, cats and other domestic animals. In addition, the puppy should be introduced to as wide a cross section of people as possible, including young children, older people, men, women and people from a variety of ethnic backgrounds.

While socialization is very important to providing the puppy with life lessons and preventing him from biting, it is not the only method of preventing unwanted biting and mouthing. Giving the puppy appropriate things to play with and bite is another good way to control inappropriate biting. Providing a variety of chew toys, ropes and other things the puppy can chew is important to preventing boredom, keeping his teeth polished and keeping him from chewing things he should not.

As with any training, it is important to be consistent when teaching the puppy not to bite. Every member of the family, as well as close friends who may visit, should all be told that the puppy is to be discouraged from biting. If one person allows the puppy to chew on them while everyone else does not, the puppy will quickly become confused, and that can make the training process much more difficult than it has to be.

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Dog Training and Your Relationship With Your Dog

September 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Dogs Training

My best friend is incredible! She’s one of those rare types who hangs on every word you say. She’s content to be quiet when I need stillness, even though she’s one of those high-drive types. All I have to do is call and she’s there in an instant, no matter what she was doing before. She puts me ahead of all her other friends, never fails to make me feel special, and is a redhead just like me. But she’s not a person, even though she’s sure she is. She is a butterfly dog; a Papillon.

When I brought this eight-week-old bundle of joy home, I didn’t know what to call her. I’m not very good at naming anything, so I usually just observe for a couple of weeks and let the animal name itself by its personality. This puppy’s name became evident in nothing flat: Tazzie. She whirled around the house, jumping up on furniture five times her size, zooming and zipping and totally charming me. She was, indeed, a Tasmanian devil pup. I quickly realized the athleticism of this dog and knew I’d have to find her a “job” when she got a little older. High-drive dogs, that don’t have “jobs,” will certainly find other outlets for their energy and those outlets aren’t usually things you would enjoy!

You already have a burning love for your puppy, but what is your relationship like? Does it come when you call it? Does it sit or lay or stay? From your first class, at your dog training school, your relationship with your dog begins to change. I will warn you, however, that anything you want to teach your dog won’t come just with a once-a-week class, even if you have the best dog training school in the world. You have to practice with them, just a little bit, every day.

Tazzie was a very food-motivated dog, so the fact that she got food every time she did something right made training a blast for her, all by itself. And this happened every day! Bonus! She made fast friends at her new dog training school, so going to class was fun as well. She got to where she would whine, as soon as we pulled in the parking lot, until I finally got her out of that car.

So now you’re taking your dog to classes in a place they love, and you’re working with them every day. During that time, you’re paying complete attention to them, teaching them to pay complete attention to you, and they get their favorite food as icing on the cake. This does incredible things for the bond between you and your dog. They learn to focus on you, no matter what, and good things will come. They get praised and fed, or praised and allowed to tug on a toy, whichever motivates the dog more, so your relationship can’t help but blossom.

Ever since Tazzie and I started training together, she has claimed me as her own. When my other two dogs want to sit on my lap, she’ll push them out of the way to get the best spot because, I am her property, as far as she’s concerned. I do give the other dogs personal time as well, but I have to put her in a sit/stay or a down/stay so she’ll let them come get love.

She is, by far, the one I can trust the most, not only because of her training, but from the bond we gained through the training. She never takes her eyes off of me, since we began at our dog training school, and it serves us well in the agility ring!

If you want to forever alter and solidify the bond you share with your dog, find yourself a good dog training school, for whatever discipline you prefer, and go for it. With a little time, money, and patience, your relationship will become a forever relationship. If you do, your dog will turn out to be your best friend too!

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