Dog Grooming: Clipping the Nails

October 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Dog Needs

If the thought of clipping your dog’s nails is frightening to you aren’t alone. Most people prefer to ask their veterinarian to do this fiddly task. There’s no reason why clipping your dogs nails should be a frightening task at all. There’s no need to regard it as any different to giving your dog a bath.

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Ideally you should start when your dog is young to get the dog used to having his feet handled regularly. Desensitizing your dog to having his paws handled will have a few other benefits too: it will make it easier for groomers or your vet to handle your dogs feet and will also mean if your dog is injured you will be able to examine his paws easier.

If it’s your first time clipping a dogs nails it might be a good idea to watch someone else do it first. Ask your vet or the groomer if you can watch while they clip your dogs nails.

You will need a special pair of clippers for the purpose. Human clippers of scissors could tear the nail and cause painful torn edges. Make sure you get the right size and type of clippers for your dog. You might find a nail file useful too.

You will also want to have some special clotting powder on hand just in case you accidentally cut the nails too short and it starts bleeding. You can find all these products at your local pet supply store.

You will want to clip the nails in a quiet place with minimal distractions. If your dog has never had his nails clipped or is particularly resistant you might want to ask someone to help you. You are after all poking at your dog with a sharp object and it could be dangerous !

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To avoid mishaps its best to slowly desensitize your dog to having his paws handled. this part should be easy. Take your dogs paws and massage them a bit.

It makes the process easier if the dogs nails are softer. You can do this by bathing the dog beforehand, massaging some baby oil into the paws or even just dipping the paw into warm water. This has the dual effect of both softening the paws and cleaning the dirt out from under the nails.

Examine the nails closely and try to locate the cluster of veins. This is called the ‘quick’ and cutting this can cause your dog to bleed. If your dog has dark nails this can be difficult. The best policy here is to trim the nails bit by bit over a longer period of time. The quick will retreat over time.

Try to cut with the right hand and hold the paw firmly. Use a calm soothing voice while you do this. You don’t want your dog to become afraid and make the clipping more difficult. Try to cut at 90 degree angles.

If you do cut too far – don’t worry! You can use some of the powder to stop the bleeding. Just sprinkle the powder over the affected area or dip the paw into the powder. There are some other household items you can use to slow the bleeding. You can use cornflower or normal powder in the same way you use the styptic powder. You can also press the dogs nail into some soap. If the bleeding is not too bad – just simply applying pressure should slow the bleeding.

If you have cut your dogs nails too far and they bleed – this may make the dog scared of the nail clipping all over again. You will need to desensitize your dog again.

If your dog is very afraid of having his nails clipped you should gradually get the dog used to the process and the tools. Start again by praising and treating the dog while you handle his paws. Then get the dog used to the clippers. Step by step desensitization coupled with positive reinforcement should ease your problem.

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Dog Grooming – Maintaining A Posh Pup

October 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Dog Needs

Dog Grooming – It’s Not Just for Poodles Anymore

Dog grooming is not simply an aesthetic bonus for our canine friends. Maintaining a regular grooming schedule will help to keep your dog both happy and healthy. Routine dog grooming will ensure that your dog is free of parasites, has healthy skin and a shiny coat, and has good dental health. Of course, the aesthetic benefits are also a plus. Only a true dog lover wants to be around a dirty, stinky dog with bad breath. Proper dog grooming will bring out the best in man’s best friend.

What’s Involved in Dog Grooming?

While dog grooming can be performed at home, the best results can be achieved via a professional dog groomer. A thorough dog grooming session takes care of all the hygienic needs of your dog. The grooming process generally takes a hour or two to accomplish, but the results are well worth the time spent. A typical dog grooming session consists of the following treatments for your dog:

* A thorough bath including flea dip (if applicable)
* A complete coat brushing to eliminate tangles and matted hair
* Styling as requested (can include accessories such as bows, rhinestones and bandannas)
* Nail trimming
* Ear cleaning and examination for parasites
* Teeth cleaning

How Often Should Dog Grooming Take Place?

The frequency with which your should groom your dog is dependent on the breed and coat quality of your dog. Some breeds are considered high maintenance in terms of dog grooming, while others need only periodic care. Before you purchase or adopt a dog, it’s a good idea to find out how much grooming it will require. A basic guide to dog grooming by coat type is as follows:

* Curly-Coated – Dogs such as Poodles have a dense and curly coat that is fairly resistant to water. These dogs will require dog grooming at least once every two months, or six times a year.

* Short-Coated – Dogs with short dense coats, such as Corgis and Boxers need a weekly brushing, but do not need to be bathed more than once or twice a year unless a problem arises.

* Long-Coated – Long coated dogs, such as Collies and Sheepdogs, require a daily brushing to keep their coats in good condition. Additional dog grooming including regular bathing, should be administered once every other month.

* Silky-Coated – Afghans, Cocker Spaniels and Pekinese dogs belong to the silky coated dog group. These dogs require daily brushing and a thorough dog grooming session four times a year.

* Wire-Coated – Wire coated dogs require considerable dog grooming. Dogs such as Terriers and Schnauzers should be bathed every three months and have their coat clipped every six to eight weeks.

* Smooth-Coated – The smooth-coated class of dogs includes Labrador Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers and Dachshunds. These are very low maintenance dogs and require only weekly brushing and bathing as necessary.

Dog Cages For A Happy Dog

October 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Dog Needs

There are many different styles and types of dog cages on the market and as expected there is also a huge range of prices.

While you might find people opposed to the suggestion of using dog cages, it is in actual fact something that most dogs are comfortable with.

Dog cages can offer your dog a sense of security, much like a child has a security blanket. By having their own little area they have a sense of security and this security can go with them if there is a need to travel.

If they feel safe within their dog cage they are less likely to become stressed when traveling in a motor vehicle.

By adding a favorite blanket or padding to the dog cage, the animal will feel comfortable and happy in familiar surroundings.

When buying a dog cage it needs to be big enough to allow your dog to stand up and turn around, but doesn’t need to be any larger than that for the dog to feel comfortable. There will need to be enough room for the dog to lie down on it’s side with it’s legs outstretched and sleep comfortably.

Usually the biggest problem will be whether your motor vehicle is big enough to fit the dog cage inside, in a safe place.

You can expect to pay between $50 and $125 for a good quality dog cage that will be big enough for a medium to large dog.

It is a small price to pay for all the benefits of dog happiness and security, along with ease of transportation. A good quality dog cage should last the life of the animal if handled correctly, which makes it a relatively cheap investment.

The cage should be purchased based on the size of the full grown animal as you won’t want to be replacing it after a year or so when you find that it is too small to house your pet when it is fully grown.

Some dog cages have dividers that are useful when transporting puppies as they restrict the area of the cage that they have access to, and as they grow the divider can be removed so they can use the whole cage.

When deciding on a dog cage you should look at all the alternatives that are offered by the biggest pet retailers on the Internet and look at all the price comparison websites to get the best deals.

Dog Care – How To Care For Your Dog

September 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Dogs


A dog will require care, attention and a commitment to look after it during its life which could be 10-15 years or longer. The commitment required includes not only routine feeding, care and time spent with the dog but also the provision of veterinary treatment if the dog becomes ill. Written below is some thing about dog caring:

 

Brushing your Dog’s Teeth
How to brush your dog’s teeth?

Step one is to pick an appropriate pet toothbrush. Save yourself time by not buying a child’s toothbrush which is usually too hard for dogs. The ideal dog toothbrush will have a long handle, an angled head to better fit the mouth and extra soft bristles. Another option is the finger toothbrush that fits over the tip of your finger.

Step two is to select appropriate toothpaste. The best pet toothpastes contain enzymes that help control plaque. Try to avoid toothpastes with baking soda, detergents, or salt sometimes found in human pastes. Fluoride may be incorporated to help control bacteria. Rather than placing the paste on top of the brush try to place it between the bristles. This allows the paste to spend the most time next to the teeth.

Step three is to get the brush with paste into your dog’s mouth and all the teeth brushed. Most dogs accept brushing if they are approached in a gentle manner. If you can start when they are young, it’s quite easy, but even older pets will accept the process. Start slowly, you can use a washcloth or piece of gauze to wipe the teeth, front and back in the same manner you will eventually be using the toothbrush. Do this twice daily for about two weeks and your dog should be familiar with the approach. Then take the pet toothbrush, soak it in warm water and start brushing daily for several days. When your dog accepts this brushing, add the pet toothpaste.

 

Dangerous Toys

Sticks and bones can splinter and cause choking or vomiting or they can perforate the mouth, throat or intestine. Hard bones can easily damage teeth. Instead, use hard, non-splintering chew toys to play fetch or to allow your pet to gnaw.

A chewing pet can shred soft, latex toys. If the toy includes a squeaking mechanism, the squeaker can be easily swallowed or cause choking.

Towels, socks, underwear and other similar clothing or materials can be swallowed by a rambunctious pet, causing intestinal obstruction.

Some dogs like to chew on or eat rocks-bad idea! Rocks can cause broken teeth and serious intestinal obstruction if swallowed.

Be careful if you offer your pet rawhides, as these can also cause intestinal obstruction if swallowed, and some are preserved with arsenic, which is toxic to pets.

Be aware of sharp objects that can cut skin, feet, eyes or ears.

Paint and wood preservatives can also be toxic to your feathered friend.

 

Exercising Your Pet

Whenever you are near a road, or wherever your dog is likely to cause a nuisance if he runs free, you should keep him on a lead. Both you and your dog will be much happier if he’s well trained. Remember that not everyone is as fond of dogs as you are and you must respect their feelings. Keep your dog under control at all times. Part of your walk should take your dog over hard ground, as this will help to keep his nails short.

Don’t make the mistake of over-exercising your dog if he’s still growing, as his bones aren’t yet strong enough to cope with the extra stress this puts on him. Little and often is the rule until your dog grows to full strength. Remember that large breeds mature later than small breeds. Ask the breeder or your vet for their advice.

Regular and varied walks are not just essential to keep your dog fit. They also give him the chance to explore and to experience new stimuli, including meeting other dogs. This will help him develop into a contented and well-adjusted dog, and avoid developing problem behavior. Make sure you supervise your dog’s exercise. Do not allow him to stray and never put him outside for the day to fend for him while you’re gone.

 

Keep Your Pet Happy and Healthy

Once you’ve brought home your new pet, you’ll want to have a long and happy life together. Here are some ways to make that happen.

Eating well and getting enough exercise are as important for dogs and cats as they are for people. Unfortunately, too often pets pick up the same bad habits, and health problems, as people do. Diabetes, heart disease, and obesity related arthritis are problems that are often preventable with a good diet and regular exercise.

A high quality dry pet food is a good centerpiece for a healthy diet. If your pet is active enough to burn the calories, most dogs and cats love canned food. It can be mixed with dry food or put out separately as a treat. Some people like to leave food out all the time so that their pets can nibble when hungry while others prefer to have regular feeding times. Either way, make sure that pets always have access to clean drinking water.

To learn more about dog training and dog care visit www.dogownersguide.org.